Welcome to Allergy Advocacy

Welcome to the Allergy Advocacy Association website.  We are here to help better serve any individuals concerned with issues relating to allergies and anaphylaxis.

Illinois Gov. signs new epi legislation

illinois governor patrick j. quinn
Illinois Governor Patrick J. Quinn hands out pens used in a signing ceremony at the State of Illinois Building in Chicago on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. The legislation expands who at Illinois schools would be allowed to administer epinephrine, from just nurses to any trained school employee or... (Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune)

New law lets more school workers use emergency injection on students

Illinois has joined the ever growing number of states enacting legislation to protect kids with allergies in schools. Unfortunately it took the death of a seventh grade student to win support.

Read more here.

Allergies come in all shapes and sizes ...

Leaves and vine…just like allergy sufferers. And they are on the rise. For many people allergies can range from sniffling and sneezing to skin rashes to gastrointestinal issues. A certain percentage, however, have more than these uncomfortable symptoms to deal with. Anaphylaxis, a serious life-threatening reaction, causes approximately 1,500 deaths a year in the United States alone. Clearly, allergies are nothing to sneeze at!

Articles for Advocacy

Jayden is allergic to peanuts
Jayden is allergic to peanuts and carries his epinephrine in a red pouch.

New Epinephrine Study Shows Alarming Results

A Disappointing Reality: Many Families of Food-Allergic Kids Are Not Carrying Epinephrine

Doctors at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio recently polled 35 families at their allergy clinic, and were shocked to find how many were not carrying epinephrine with them. This includes 29% of those who previously had to use it due to a bad allergic reaction. This article  gives some very helpful advice on how to remember to carry it everywhere and how to to get prescription reminders and discounts.

By David Stukus, MD

It is a well-known fact that epinephrine is the best treatment for anaphylactic reactions. Patients or their adult caregivers are urged to always keep their epinephrine auto-injectors close at hand. Epinephrine should be given as early as possible after a reaction begins.

Read the article here

shelled and unshelled peanutsPeanut allergy prevalence in US children continues to rise

Researchers at Project Viva, conducted by Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates in Massachusetts, confirmed what we all have been reading about in the news: peanut allergies in children continue to rise. The research was conducted between 1999 and 2002 and found the prevalence of peanut allergies in children ranges from 2-5%, higher than what was previously reported.

Read the article here

St. John Fisher Nursing Students Support Epinephrine in NY Schools

Susan McCarthy, Evelyn Ouellette and Virginia Riggall
L to R: Susan McCarthy, Evelyn Ouellette and Virginia Riggall.

When three Doctorate of Nursing Practice students at St. John Fisher College were challenged by a professor to choose a current health issue to advocate for, they decided to raise awareness about the risk of anaphylaxis in schools and emphasize the importance of having both epinephrine access and personnel trained to administer it.

Read all about the white paper they wrote here:


US Capitol Dome with flagFunding the Epinephrine Gap

-From the Food Allergies Research and Education e-newsletter May 19, 2014

Now that more than 40 states allow or require their schools to stock emergency epinephrine auto-injectors, the challenge for many schools is how to pay for these auto-injectors and staff training. In 2010, Congress passed the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Management Act, which directed ...

Read the article here

Upcoming Events

August 18 2014, GBFAA August meeting

Greater Buffalo Food Allergy Alliance (GBFAA) August meeting

Monday, August 18th
7pm–9pm
Cleveland Hill Fire District
440 Cleveland Drive,
Cheektowaga, NY 14225

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